Sunday, December 13, 2015

Read "Poison Spring"

I spoke recently to Tony Mitra, a Canadian journalist, about the danger of pesticides. The danger is twofold: pesticides are toxic petrochemicals and governments approve them with scant if any evidence of safety. Add the uncertainty of the industry testing its own products and the mixture becomes hazardous. I urge you to inform yourself by listening to the interview (below) and, above all, read my book: "Poison Spring."

https://www.change.org/p/minister-of-health-canada-justin-trudeau-health-canada-prove-glyphosate-is-safe/u/14583474

Monday, June 8, 2015

It's time to declare a truce in the chemical war on weeds - Seattle GMO | Examiner.com

It's time to declare a truce in the chemical war on weeds - Seattle GMO | Examiner.com:



"As the war on weeds gears up for summer, the London-based Institute for Science in Society publishes a Manifesto on Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup®. The Manifesto was published today, June 8, and already 155 scientists and medical professionals have signed, calling on all governments to ban glyphosate-based herbicides. 


The Manifesto states in part:

“We, the undersigned international scientists and medical professionals, call on governments at all levels to ban the spraying of glyphosate herbicides. As professionals who have read the literature on glyphosate herbicides and their effects, we have concluded that they are causing irreparable harm. 



 The World Health Organization’s recent reclassification of glyphosate as a 'probable human carcinogen' is only a small part of the known toxicity of glyphosate herbicides. Chronic exposure to glyphosate herbicides is associated not only with cancers, but also with infertility, impotence, abortions, birth defects, neurotoxicity, hormonal disruption, immune reactions, an unnamed fatal kidney disease, chronic diarrhoea, autism and other ailments.” 


 Signature collection is ongoing. If you are a scientist or medical professional, you may sign the Manifesto here. Non-scientists can sign a separate list in support of the Manifesto. If your local government is spraying toxic herbicides in a war on weeds, you can print out the Manifesto and present it to your officials."


According to Vallianatos (with Jenkins), authors of Poison Spring: The Secret History of Pollution and the EPA, the scientific credibility of the EPA has been damaged due to the history of fraud in the testing of these toxic chemicals that has been going on for decades. Vallianatos quotes the EPA scientist Adrian Gross as saying that EPA scientists don't actually read the studies they get from the chemical companies, but it's a “cut-and-paste business.” According to Vallianatos, “Staff scientists were openly using industry's own in-house (and therefore inherently biased) science in the formal approval process of dangerous chemicals. This was not oversight, it was rubber-stamping” [p. 123]. Chapter 7 gives a hair-raising account of how data is fabricated and falsified in these industry studies. According to Gross, such studies are unreliable “because EPA toxicologists don't really review them. ... Instead, they go straight to the company's summary and lift it word for word and give it as their own evaluation of those studies” [p. 130].

Friday, May 15, 2015

Town Hall Seattle presentation of "Poison Spring," April 13, 2014

The EPA’s Hidden Secret
7:30PM, Sunday, April 13, 2014
EG Vallianatos
Since its inception in 1970, the Environmental Protection Agency has been tasked with keeping our food, rivers, and farms safe from chemicals and other harmful substances. Poison Spring: The Secret History of Pollution and the EPA reveals the unknown side of the EPA, one where pesticides and insecticides are approved substances. According to author E.G. Vallianatos, the EPA allows millions of pounds of synthetic chemicals and substances to be deposited into our water systems and food every day. Drawing on extensive field interviews, as well as his 25 years as an EPA employee, Vallianatos traces the vein of corruption, political pressures, and corporate interests that have transformed the agency into a protector of the “chemical-industrial complex.” With co-author McKay Jenkins, he shows how the EPA not only fails to protect us from harmful chemicals, but betrays its primary mission in the process.